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“Deferred Action” Policy Should Help Minnesota’s Latino Community

 On June 15, 2012, President Obama presented his “deferred action” executive order. This action by the President will give some young undocumented immigrants the ability to receive a two-year permit that will protect them from being deported.

Not everyone is eligible for the permit. Immigrants must be under the age of 31 and must have arrived in the United States before they turned 16 years old. They are also required to have earned or be earning a high school diploma or GED, or serve in the military. Those eligible need to apply for the permit and meet additional qualifications.

In Minnesota, approximately 2,500 to 4,000 Latinos are expected to benefit from the policy. Some experts estimate that 1.4 million young people nationwide could benefit from the new law.

Not everyone, however, feels comfortable with the policy change. In order to obtain the permit, immigrants need to register with the Department of Homeland Security. Some worry that the information they provide might be used to reach their family members who may be at-risk for deportation, but do not meet the qualifications for a permit. Others worry what will happen to them after the two-year permit expires.

But many immigrants are embracing the new opportunity. Some in the community hope the policy will encourage young immigrants to continue their college education since they do not have to fear deportation. The permit will give qualified students work permits, but they will probably not be eligible for such benefits as financial aid or in-state tuition.

Source: LoanSafe.org, “Minnesota’s Latino Students Weigh chance to Study and Work Without Fear of Deportation,” Evan Bedard, August 14, 2012.

  • Our firm handles situations similar to those discussed in this post. To learn more about our practice, please visit our Minnesota deportation defense page.

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